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Gator Great Wilber Marshall needs

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Gator Great Wilber Marshall needs

Postby guardian » Mon Dec 24, 2012 1:29 am

Gator great Wilber Marshall needs our help.

Wilber was an unchained beast in the middle of the UF defense and in NFL defenses, and stands with Florida football greats Steve Spurrier, Jack Youngblood, Emmitt Smith and Danny Wuerffel in the Ring of Honor at UF. He was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 2008.

In the same year, after battling the NFL suits for years, he was finally declared "permanently disabled." He was already bankrupt and now lives off the paltry NFL disability pension.

One of the reasons I quit following the NFL is how the retired players are treated by both the union and the owners. Both parties are grossly disgusting when they are slicing the $$pie, and are negligent when considering the players who paved the yellow brick road.

Wilber is only 50. He earned, and deserves, better, especially from us.

We are the Gators. We should not leave people behind.

You guys/gals are intelligent. How can we help in this case and/or in the many others that have escaped our attention or most certainly will capture our attention?

Ideas?
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Re: Gator Great Wilber Marshall needs

Postby crosscreekcooter » Mon Dec 24, 2012 8:58 am

guardian wrote:Gator great Wilber Marshall needs our help.

Wilber was an unchained beast in the middle of the UF defense and in NFL defenses, and stands with Florida football greats Steve Spurrier, Jack Youngblood, Emmitt Smith and Danny Wuerffel in the Ring of Honor at UF. He was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 2008.

In the same year, after battling the NFL suits for years, he was finally declared "permanently disabled." He was already bankrupt and now lives off the paltry NFL disability pension.

One of the reasons I quit following the NFL is how the retired players are treated by both the union and the owners. Both parties are grossly disgusting when they are slicing the $$pie, and are negligent when considering the players who paved the yellow brick road.

Wilber is only 50. He earned, and deserves, better, especially from us.

We are the Gators. We should not leave people behind.

You guys/gals are intelligent. How can we help in this case and/or in the many others that have escaped our attention or most certainly will capture our attention?

Ideas?

Vote against the politicians that take union money for election campaigns? Maybe if the players had personal guarantees on the stadium mortgage and day to day business operations they could get a larger slice than they get now.
here's a list of the 10 highest paid football players today.
http://www.athlonsports.com/nfl/top-10-highest-paid-nfl-players-2012
1. Dwight Freeney, OLB, Colts – $19 million
Indy’s top speed rusher since 2002, Freeney has posted 10 or more sacks in seven of his 10 NFL seasons heading into 2012. In his 11th (and highest paid) year in the league, the undersized 6’1”, 268-pound sack artist ranks No. 24 on the all-time sacks list but No. 1 in 2012 NFL player paychecks.


2. Elvis Dumervil, OLB, Broncos – $18.9 million
Although Elvis broke Dwight Freeney’s Big East sack record, he still fell to the fourth round of the 2006 NFL Draft. Since then, Dumervil has been an example of production over projection, recording 55.5 sacks in his first 80 NFL games — and earning the second-highest payday in the league this season.


3. Peyton Manning, QB, Broncos – $18 million
Despite undergoing as many neck surgeries as he has MVP awards, Manning was able to ink a five-year, $96 million deal with the Broncos this past offseason. The 36-year-old played 14 seasons before missing the entire 2011 campaign due to injury. But he bounced back in a big way in 2012 — at least financially.


4. Sam Bradford, QB, Rams – $15.6 million
The last No. 1 overall pick before the new Collective Bargaining Agreement, Bradford slid in under the wire and signed with the Rams to the tune of six years and $78 million — compared to the four years and $22 million the Panthers gave Cam Newton the following year. It pays to have good timing.


5. Philip Rivers, QB, Chargers – $15.3 million
Say what you will about Rivers’ on-field demeanor, but he is one of the most reliable players in the game today. Since Rivers took over for Drew Brees as the starter in San Diego in 2006, he has never missed a start, is 30 games over .500 and has nearly 90 more TDs than INTs. That type of dependability is expensive.


6. Jared Allen, DE, Vikings – $15.2 million
The tone setter for the Vikes, Allen is a wild man and live wire off the edge. The No. 2 active sack leader (and No. 18 all-time) is nearly unblockable when he’s on top of his game. In 131 career contests, Allen has 109 sacks, 43 passes defended and 27 forced fumbles, making him easily one of the most valuable players in the league.


7. Tamba Hali, OLB, Chiefs – $14.5 million
The pass rushing heir to Jared Allen in Kansas City, Hali signed a five-year, $60 million contract following a 14.5-sack season in 2010. The high motor hybrid end-linebacker has the versatility to thrive in either a 4-3 or 3-4 scheme and has proven to be worth the money invested by the Chiefs.


8. Michael Vick, QB, Eagles – $13.9 million
Capping his redemption story, Vick inked a $100 million deal in 2011. But the roller coaster ride that is the Mike Vick Experience has hit a low point, with 13 turnovers and just nine scores through the first six games of 2012. Due to make $16 million in 2013, Vick may be cut loose if he can’t lead Philly to the playoffs this year.


9. Trent Williams, LT, Redskins – $13.4 million
The young dancing bear has failed multiple drug tests and missed time due to a variety of injuries, so this contract reeks of being a bad deal. But as Robert Griffin III’s blindside bodyguard, Williams is charged with protecting the face of the franchise inside the pocket and whoever is doing that will make plenty of coin.


10. Larry Fitzgerald, WR, Cardinals – $13.25 million
While it has been argued that Fitzgerald’s career is suffering from a lack of quality QB play — from anyone other than Kurt Warner, that is — the numbers don’t back that up. Fitzgerald joined Randy Moss as only the second receiver in history to top 10,000 yards before turning 30. And he’s a top-10 paid player in 2012. Who needs a QB?

From Forbes- http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/11_06/b4214058615722.htm
• Average NFL player salary: $1.9 million
• Median NFL player salary: $770,000
• Average NFL career length: 3.5 years
• Number of players on injured reserve in 2010: 352
• Average NFL player age: 27

Data: National Football League; National Football League Players Assn.

Wilbur earned an average of a million dollars a year (1990 dollars) while in the NFL for 12 years. Was he a great Gator? Absolutely. Do we owe him something? Maybe respect. WM used the collegiate platform to become the highest paid Washington Redskin of his era. He was the first free agent. Do I feel sorry for his medical condition? Of course. I have had spinal surgeries and have two bad knees as well. Football is a violent sport. Sounds to me like he could have used a financial advisor instead of a bankruptcy lawyer. And please, no more comments about where he came from or owners taking advantage of the players. He could just as easily have been a house painter.
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Re: Gator Great Wilber Marshall needs

Postby gatorspook » Mon Dec 24, 2012 10:10 am

I heard Tony Boselli (who is hampered if not disabled totally) say that it is a multi billion dollar issue. Not a matter of all of the current players kicking in a few bucks.

Not saying they shouldn't do something, just that it's a big issue.
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Re: Gator Great Wilber Marshall needs

Postby Class of '78 » Mon Dec 24, 2012 10:43 am

I love Wilber Marshall. He's probably the best pure athlete this university has produced. Ironically, he was the first player to successfully test free agency, leaving my Bears for the Redskins after the 1987 season. Not coincidentally, it wasn't long after that the Bears ceased being dominant.

Marshall is no longer a free agent but rather a middle-aged man trapped in a broken body. I agree with the message that the NFL needs to do a better job of taking care of its own.
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Re: Gator Great Wilber Marshall needs

Postby BMF » Mon Dec 24, 2012 11:36 am

Agree w/ CCC. All we owe Wilber Marshall is respect.

Wilber going bankrupt isn't my fault or yours....

The NFL needs to "take care of it's own" for sure. But they also need to stop charging $100 for crap tickets to crap games (see ANY game played by the Jacksonville Jaguars...or any pre-season game for that matter).

If Wilber is collecting a disability pension he should start collecting his regular NFL pension soon (in addition).

Again, we owe nothing to the man but respect. I'm in my early 40's...so I remember him very, very well. He was one of my first UF football hero's as a kid.

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Re: Gator Great Wilber Marshall needs

Postby crosscreekcooter » Mon Dec 24, 2012 11:46 am

Maybe the NFL could do a better job of living their lives for them (think big-government) by instituting a forced-investment of a portion of the player's salary and all of their union dues in some sort of stable, long-term retirement vehicle that could be used as a safety net. They could even call it a retirement tax. Those few players prudent enough to avoid the high rollers life could allow their contributions to stay in the plan and be used to support those players whose lives have higher demands (squandered their money). This giving back would surely satisfy the socialist-state fostered "union mentality." It would be thought of as sort of a self-funded NFL entitlement program.
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Re: Gator Great Wilber Marshall needs

Postby MJMGator » Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:27 pm

One of my all-time favorite Gators and a true HOFer. That said, we ALL are responsible for our own actions in life and I only wish I had the opportunity to make the kind of money he made. He has my utmost respect and admiration for his accomplishments on the field, but I don't feel any of us owes him any type of financial support.
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Re: Gator Great Wilber Marshall needs

Postby scooby321 » Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:39 pm

As much as a I loved Wilber Marshall. He is the normal in the NFL. Bankrupt and unprepared.
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Re: Gator Great Wilber Marshall needs

Postby GatorGeezer » Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:45 pm

Your right Cross creek! And just think the NFL could enact legislation to allow those funds to be distributed to anyone who claims some sort of disability, regardless of the fact that they never set foot in a football stadium or even knew a player! And the, no doubt, Thousands of despondent and needy girlfriends and illegitimate children, spawned from the loins of these great athletes could be taken care of as well. And lets not forget extended families of "used up" and forlorned Sports Agents....
Wait a minute....That sounds familiar....!
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Re: Gator Great Wilber Marshall needs

Postby CGgater » Mon Dec 24, 2012 1:15 pm

crosscreekcooter wrote:Maybe the NFL could do a better job of living their lives for them (think big-government) by instituting a forced-investment of a portion of the player's salary and all of their union dues in some sort of stable, long-term retirement vehicle that could be used as a safety net. They could even call it a retirement tax. Those few players prudent enough to avoid the high rollers life could allow their contributions to stay in the plan and be used to support those players whose lives have higher demands (squandered their money). This giving back would surely satisfy the socialist-state fostered "union mentality." It would be thought of as sort of a self-funded NFL entitlement program.


Wow. Major can of worms opened up here. :lol:

Free-market, capitalist businesses have offered stock-options, 401k, IRA or pension plans for a long time. It's the American way. Why didn't the NFL start something like this 50 years ago???

Side note: A not-so-quick comment on the "socialist-state fostered union mentality." Unions get a bad rap, though it's probably earned. However, I was a union electrician for a couple of years before I joined the CG. Unlike the auto and airline industries, the electrician's union I belonged to fought hard for fair wages. $11.50 an hour in 1990 was not extravagant. It seemed like every year, we were voting to apply our entire raise towards our medical insurance premiums to avoid losing medical care. Going back to our roots, the IBEW did a ton of good to improve safe working conditions and even non-union workers have benefited from union scale setting pay standards. Unfortunately, what started out as a great solution to the problems of the early Industrial Age has grown out of control in many instances (UAW being one of the biggest perceived culprits).

Didn't mean to rant. I understand the stereotypical view of unions. Just wanted to give a different viewpoint. I hope this isn't high-jacking the thread. :embarrassed:
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Re: Gator Great Wilber Marshall needs

Postby Swamp82 » Mon Dec 24, 2012 1:15 pm

Like it was said earlier, he should have had an investment Broker.
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Re: Gator Great Wilber Marshall needs

Postby crosscreekcooter » Mon Dec 24, 2012 1:22 pm

I just couln't find an appropropriate spot for arguing the 2nd amendment.
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Re: Gator Great Wilber Marshall needs

Postby Class of '78 » Mon Dec 24, 2012 1:41 pm

crosscreekcooter wrote:Maybe the NFL could do a better job of living their lives for them (think big-government) by instituting a forced-investment of a portion of the player's salary and all of their union dues in some sort of stable, long-term retirement vehicle that could be used as a safety net. They could even call it a retirement tax. Those few players prudent enough to avoid the high rollers life could allow their contributions to stay in the plan and be used to support those players whose lives have higher demands (squandered their money). This giving back would surely satisfy the socialist-state fostered "union mentality." It would be thought of as sort of a self-funded NFL entitlement program.


I sense tongue firmly in cheek here. :lol: The NFL and teams are already counseling players on how to more wisely use their money. The player's agents have, I think, a fiduciary duty to chip in with competent advice as well. Beyond that and a more solid retirement plan, which I believe in, it does take on the look and feel of socialism.

These guys are employees only from the start to finish of each contract, which essentially makes them self-employed. Otherwise, at what point, beyond some sort of base retirement, does the responsibility reasonably fall on the players' shoulders to do what's in their best long-term interest?
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Re: Gator Great Wilber Marshall needs

Postby crosscreekcooter » Mon Dec 24, 2012 1:48 pm

Class of '78 wrote:
crosscreekcooter wrote:Maybe the NFL could do a better job of living their lives for them (think big-government) by instituting a forced-investment of a portion of the player's salary and all of their union dues in some sort of stable, long-term retirement vehicle that could be used as a safety net. They could even call it a retirement tax. Those few players prudent enough to avoid the high rollers life could allow their contributions to stay in the plan and be used to support those players whose lives have higher demands (squandered their money). This giving back would surely satisfy the socialist-state fostered "union mentality." It would be thought of as sort of a self-funded NFL entitlement program.


I sense tongue firmly in cheek here. :lol: The NFL and teams are already counseling players on how to more wisely use their money. The player's agents have, I think, a fiduciary duty to chip in with competent advice as well. Beyond that and a more solid retirement plan, which I believe in, it does take on the look and feel of socialism.

These guys are employees only from the start to finish of each contract, which essentially makes them self-employed. Otherwise, at what point, beyond some sort of base retirement, does the responsibility reasonably fall on the players' shoulders to do what's in their best long-term interest?

I think I just had one too many cups of coffee this morning.
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Re: Gator Great Wilber Marshall needs

Postby Scott512 » Mon Dec 24, 2012 1:57 pm

scooby321 wrote:As much as a I loved Wilber Marshall. He is the normal in the NFL. Bankrupt and unprepared.

This is sad to hear. Terrible. :(
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Re: Gator Great Wilber Marshall needs

Postby Ringer » Mon Dec 24, 2012 2:53 pm

I've been a great Gator fan all my life and now I'm retired living on less than $2000.00 per month. I don't see a line of people waiting to help me, nor do I want it. I, just like Wilber, am responsible for my own life.


But if you want to send money............... ;)
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Re: Gator Great Wilber Marshall needs

Postby StreetFightingGator » Mon Dec 24, 2012 7:03 pm

Somehow I just can't muster much sympathy for a guy who made more money in a 12 year career than I will make in two lifetimes. Why does the NFL owe former players anything? They make more money in just one or two seasons than the average person does in thirty years. I understand the guy has physical problems, but guess what? So do a lot of blue collar workers like bricklayers, construction workers, factory laborers, etc., who don't make 1/20th of what he did!

He chose to participate in a violent game that carries a significant risk of injury. That is part of the reason why players like him are so well-compensated. It isn't the NFL's job to take care of its former players. IIt's called personal responsibility. A concept that we seem to have long forgotten in this country. It's people like the OP who are going to bankrupt this country with their nanny-state mentality.

Much respect to a Gator great, but no one owes him anything!
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Re: Gator Great Wilber Marshall needs

Postby Class of '78 » Mon Dec 24, 2012 9:21 pm

The irony here, as I attempted to convey in a previous post, is that Marshall was the FIRST GUY to successfully test free agency, which translated to a big payday for him.

He evidently had an awareness about him on how to up his income, but sorely lacked awareness once it hit the bank. On whose shoulders does that lie?

The NFL is raking in some serious dough thanks to the long ago efforts of guys like Wilber Marshall, so it can and should do something to mitigate the hurt when they're down. But, please, don't go too overboard on the pity.
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Re: Gator Great Wilber Marshall needs

Postby crosscreekcooter » Mon Dec 24, 2012 9:38 pm

I think the players, their attorneys, and their union smell a big payday somewhere down the road from a settlement that they all will share in. It will probably be kinda like the decisions handed down against the asbestos manufacturers.
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Re: Gator Great Wilber Marshall needs

Postby Swamp82 » Mon Dec 24, 2012 10:53 pm

That's the problem now, once the lawyers get their hands on it... Nasty
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